Cream

Cream

The cream is obtained by centrifuging the milk at high speed; density relatively minor, it collects at the center of the centrifuge and from here is made to flow outside, while the milk is collected by other way. A creams have a short shelf life and should be kept in the fridge.
In addition to the normal cream, there are other types such as:
Clotted cream (sometimes called Devonshire, clouted, scalded or Cornish cream), is very rich cream (fat content 55 per cent) is a speciality of south-west England. Whipped cream (Aerosol cream) has a recognisably creamy and slightly sweet taste. Cream that has been treated at an ultra-high temperature to preserve it (UHT cream) is whipped and packed into aerosol containers with stabilisers and up to 13 per cent added sugar; a gas propellant under high pressure is added to expel the cream.
Crème fraîche is a French ingredient and the best comes from a strictly controlled area of Normandy. It is made by leaving fresh cream from pasteurised cow's milk to mature and ferment through the action of natural bacteria.
Soured cream (also called sour cream) is produced by inoculating pasteurised and homogenised single cream with starter cultures of bacteria to convert the lactose into lactic acid. Double cream is an UHT (ultra-high temperature) treated long-life cream staple in Italian cooking, particularly in sauces.
The cream, depending on the type, has different uses such as: added to sauces, soups, savory and sweet dishes, a main ingredient in ice creams and other desserts; as a topping for fruit, drinks, cakes, puddings and breakfast cereals.


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